Daily Archives: January 21, 2013

German Government Wants to Create Special Economic Zones in Europe – SPIEGEL ONLINE

Berlin Proposes European Special Economic Zones

With Europe beginning to look for alternatives to its exclusive focus on austerity, the German government has developed a six-point plan to foster economic growth in Europe, SPIEGEL has learned. Included in the proposal is the creation of special economic zones in struggling euro-zone countries.

via German Government Wants to Create Special Economic Zones in Europe – SPIEGEL ONLINE.

Ψυχανάλυση του Μνημονίου- ‘Ενα πρόγραμμα χειραγώγησης των Ελλήνων. Του Δημ. Κωνσταντακόπουλου | TVXS – TV Χωρίς Σύνορα

Το αληθινό έργο που παίζεται δεν είναι «φορολογική μεταρρύθμιση», «αγορά ομολόγων», «ασφαλιστικό». Είναι «Η δολοφονία μιας χώρας». Αυτός που φοράει την άσπρη μπλούζα του γιατρού είναι ο δολοφόνος. Στον άρρωστο παρέχεται τεχνητή αναπνοή και στήριξη της καρδιακής λειτουργίας με … δόσεις, ενώ του αφαιρούνται, ένα-ένα, τα ζωτικότερα όργανα, οι βασικές κρατικές λειτουργίες και ότι απέμεινε να στηρίξει οικονομία/κοινωνία.

via Ψυχανάλυση του Μνημονίου- ‘Ενα πρόγραμμα χειραγώγησης των Ελλήνων. Του Δημ. Κωνσταντακόπουλου | TVXS – TV Χωρίς Σύνορα.

New Constitutionalism: Theorizing European Integration

In “European Governance and New Constitutionalism: Economic Monetary Union and Alternatives to Disciplinary Neoliberalism in Europe” (1998) and “Constitutionalizing Inequality and the Clash of Globalizations” (2002), Gill describes New Constitutionalism as an international framework to separate economic policy from direct political control to make governments more responsive to market forces instead of popular political imperatives. It is the politico-legal dimension of disciplinary neo-liberalism where market forces seek to secure property rights, freedom of capital flows, low inflation, and loose labor market regulation. This can be visualized in much the same way constitutions entrench policies, procedures, and rights at the national level that cannot be easily changed by simple majority vote; for example property rights in the United States. These policies serve to “lock in” economic reforms, and inhibit future governments from changing course on market liberalization by de-politicizing economic policy from popular political pressure. One key aspect is the privatization of state-owned assets.

via New Constitutionalism: Theorizing European Integration.

Κυβερνητικός αξιωματούχος στους ΝΥΤ: Μετά τη βίλα Αμαλίας, η σειρά των συνδικάτων – Απάντηση Κεδίκογλου | TVXS – TV Χωρίς Σύνορα

«είναι απαραίτητες για να δείξουν ότι η κυβέρνηση είναι αποφασισμένη να συγκρουστεί και με άλλες ομάδες, μεταξύ των οποίων μαχητικά συνδικάτα που μπορούν να εμποδίσουν τα σχέδια της κυβέρνησης Σαμαρά για αντιδημοφιλείς οικονομικές μεταρρυθμίσεις και ιδιωτικοποιήσεις που ζητούν οι δανειστές της Ελλάδας».

via Κυβερνητικός αξιωματούχος στους ΝΥΤ: Μετά τη βίλα Αμαλίας, η σειρά των συνδικάτων – Απάντηση Κεδίκογλου | TVXS – TV Χωρίς Σύνορα.

European Fiscal Compact – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Fiscal Compact[3][4] (formally, the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance in the Economic and Monetary Union; also referred to as TSCG or more plainly the Fiscal Stability Treaty[5]), is an intergovernmental treaty introduced as a new stricter version of the previous Stability and Growth Pact, signed on 2 March 2012 by all member states of the European Union (EU), except the Czech Republic and the United Kingdom.[1]

The treaty entered into force on 1 January 2013 for the 16 states which completed ratification prior of this date.[6] For subsequent ratifiers, it will enter into force on the first day of the month following the deposit of ratification instruments. Two non-euro member state expressed their intent to be bound by the fiscal provisions in the treaty (titles III and IV) upon ratification, while for the remaining non-eurozone states these provisions will only apply from the date the state adopts the euro.[7]

via European Fiscal Compact – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

European Stability Mechanism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Currently EFSF and ESM are only allowed to offer financial stability loans directly to sovereign states, meaning that offered bank recapitalisation packages is first paid to the state and then transferred to the suffering financial sector; and thus these type of loans are accounted for as national debt of the sovereign state. It was decided on the EU summit on 19 October 2012, that ESM bank recapitalisation packages in the future starting from the date in 2013 where ECBs new supervision unit for the financial sector will be founded, instead only shall by paid directly to the financial sector, so that it no longer counts as state debt in the statistics. The decision will be outlined in more details in December 2012, but is likely only to involve ESM bank recapitalisations paid to cover “new cash needs” discovered after 2012 and not the “legacy cash needs” discovered prior of 2013.[13][14

via European Stability Mechanism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.